CBT-Standards

CBT Standards of Professional Behavior

 
I. Standards for Classroom Behavior

Generally, all students enrolled in College of Business and Technology (CBT) classes are expected to behave in a manner that is respectful and conducive to a good learning environment. Students are required to comply with all NSU policies as outlined in the NSU Catalog and on the NSU web site. The following definitions address unacceptable behavior in classrooms, hallways or offices within CBT.

1.      Attendance and Tardiness: failure to comply with a professor’s/instructor’s attendance policies as stated in the course syllabus.

2.      Disruptive Behavior: any behavior that interferes with another student’s ability to participate in class or creates an environment that is not conducive to learning.

3.      Food, Drink and Tobacco use: consuming food or beverages or using tobacco in any laboratory or in a manner that is not conducive to an effective learning environment.

4.      Electronic Devices: any electronic device that has not been approved by the professor/instructor that is on (power is on) in the classroom during a scheduled class time.

5.      Materials Not Related to Class: newspapers, books, magazines, study guides, etc. not related to the class being attended.

6.      Class Preparation: students demonstrating a lack of responsibility by not completing required assignments.

7.      Hygiene and Attire: attending class without appropriate attire and hygiene such that it affects the learning environment for the professor/instructor or other students.

8.      Deadlines and Due Dates: requesting permission for submitting assignments beyond the announced due date without just cause.

9.      Exams: failure to follow any policy outlined in the syllabus with regard to taking and rescheduling of exams.

10. Meeting with Professors/Instructors: disrespectful or disruptive behavior towards a student’s professor/instructor.


II. Standards for Academic Integrity

Academic fraud and dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following categories: cheating, plagiarism, copyright infringement, fabrication, multiple submissions, obtaining unfair advantage, unauthorized access to academic or administrative systems, aiding and abetting, impersonation, and threatening harm.

A. Traditional Classroom Standards

1.      Cheating: using unauthorized notes, aids, or information on an examination; altering a graded work prior to its return to a faculty member or allowing another person to do one's own work and submitting it for grading.

2.      Plagiarism: submitting material that in part or whole is not one's own work or submitting one's own work without properly attributing the correct sources of its content.

3.      Copyright Infringement:  using copyrighted materials (print, electronic, or multimedia) in a manner that violates copyright laws.

4.      Fabrication: inventing or falsifying information, data, or citation; presenting data gathered outside of acceptable professorial guidelines; failing to provide an accurate account of how information, data or citations were gathered; altering documents affecting academic records; forging signatures or authorizing false information on an official academic document, grade, letter, form, ID card, or any other university document; submitting false excuses for absence, delay or illness.

5.      Multiple Submissions: submitting identical papers or course work for credit in more than one course without prior permission of the instructor.

6.      Obtaining Unfair Advantage:

a)   Gaining or providing access to examination materials prior to the time authorized by an instructor

b)   Stealing, defacing, or destroying library or research materials which can deprive others of their use

c)   Unauthorized collaboration on an academic assignment

d)   Retaining, possessing, or circulating previously used examination materials without the instructor's permission

e)   Obstructing or interfering with another student's academic work

f)    Engaging in any activity designed to obtain an unfair advantage over another student in the same course

g)   Offering bribery to staff or any university employee to effect a grade change, or gain unfair advantage over other students.

7.      Unauthorized Access: viewing or altering in any way computer records, modifying computer programs or systems, releasing or distributing information gathered via unauthorized access, or in any way interfering with the use or availability of computer systems/information.

8.      Aiding and Abetting: providing material, information, or other assistance, which violates the Standards for Academic Integrity; providing false information in connection with any inquiry regarding academic integrity.

9.      Impersonation: impersonating or allowing to be impersonated by another individual during classes, examination or other university activities.

10. Threatening Harm: threatening, effecting, or encouraging bodily, professional or financial harm to any faculty, staff, administrator or student who has witnessed or reported a violation of the CBT Standards of Professional Behavior.

B. Virtual Classroom Standards

In addition to the ten standards stated above, the following standards apply to online, online/hybrid, and distance learning teaching environments.

1.      Professional Online Etiquette: Maintenance of professional business-like demeanor in all communications (e.g., telephone, e-mail, IM, etc.) between student and professor, and among students themselves. Acceptable communication etiquette should be held at a higher standard than common, informal communication styles between friends and classmates.

2.      Electronic Document Exchange: the sharing of student computers to complete individual assignments, exams, and the sharing of electronic files.

3.      Online Exam Duplication: Changing the form of an exam from its original electronic version.

4.      Plagiarism: submitting material that in part or whole is not one's own work; submitting one's own work without properly attributing the correct sources of its content.

5.      Copyright Infringement: using copyrighted materials (print, electronic, or multimedia) in a manner that violates copyright laws.

III. Procedure for addressing College of Business and Technology Standards of Professional Behavior Violations

The College of Business and Technology reserves the right to determine the appropriate procedure to follow based on fact pattern of the student behavior in question.   

A.  Informal Process for Addressing Concerns:

1.  A student is verbally notified by a CBT faculty member of a potential CBT Student Standard violation within one academic business day of the incident.

2.  A meeting with the CBT faculty member and accused student(s) will be held to provide student(s) information as to the behavior in question.

3. The accused student(s) will have the opportunity to provide perspective regarding the behavior in question.

4. The faculty member will determine if the information presented warrants dismissal of accusation or appropriate measures to address student behavior.

5.  If student is found responsible for violating CBT Standards of Professional Behavior, then reasonable measures to correct student behavior will be taken. 

6. There is no appeal for the informal process outlined above.


B.  Formal Process for addressing concerns 

1.  A student is notified by a CBT faculty member of a potential CBT Student Standard violation within five academic business day of the incident.

2.  A meeting with the academic department chair, CBT faculty member and accused student(s) will be held to provide student(s) information as to the behavior in question.

3.  The accused student(s) will have the opportunity to provide perspective regarding the behavior in question.

4. The academic department chair will determine if the information presented warrants dismissal of accusation or a finding of responsibility. 

5.  If student is found responsible for violating CBT Student Standards, then reasonable measures to correct student behavior will be taken which may include removal from specific academic course.

6.  A student found responsible for violating the CBT Standards of Professional Behavior may appeal once to the Dean of the College of Business and Technology, or designee.  The decision of that appeal is final.

7.  The CBT may choose to refer student behavior in question to Student Affairs for University Conduct Code review.

8.  Student behavior may be co-adjudicated between CBT and Student Affairs.  In this case, the University Student Conduct Code procedures will be followed. 

9.  If student behavior warrants potential removal from CBT and/or University, then the case will be forwarded to Student Affairs for adjudication following the University Student Conduct Code.